MICROSOFT SHAREPOINT 2010 BOOK

adminComment(0)

This book is an excellent starting point in learning SharePoint The title is a bit misleading because it definitely does not cover EVERYTHING, but it is easy. Get a detailed look inside SharePoint —and master the intricacies of Dave is the author of the book "Workflow in the Microsoft Office System" and . Microsoft SharePoint Server Bible [Steven Mann] on pawnfacumapbma.gq and co-authored several books related to the subjects of SharePoint, InfoPath, and.


Microsoft Sharepoint 2010 Book

Author:VENUS LAKOWSKI
Language:English, Arabic, Portuguese
Country:Sudan
Genre:Children & Youth
Pages:436
Published (Last):21.04.2016
ISBN:411-4-33956-897-9
ePub File Size:22.88 MB
PDF File Size:9.46 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Registration Required]
Downloads:48142
Uploaded by: STEVIE

Get a detailed look inside SharePoint and master the intricacies of developing Book. Not for sale. Sorry, this book is no longer in print. Summary: Read preview book excerpts from Inside Microsoft SharePoint Learn what's new with the SharePoint developer platform from. Read free book chapters about developing for Microsoft SharePoint To view book chapters relating to SharePoint , click the items to the.

To create a dashboard page in SharePoint 1. Go to the SharePoint site where you want to add your dashboard page, expand the Site Actions drop-down list, and choose More Options, as shown in the following illustration. Alternatively, depending on whether Silverlight is enabled, you might see a slightly different user interface.

Then click Create on the right-hand side of the page. Now you must make some choices.

As shown in the following illustration, you need to select your preferred page layout, enter a name for the page, and specify where to store the page. Accept the defaults, and name the page WebPartPage. Feel free to experiment with the different layout options available—whatever you find pleasing. The Save Location is the document library where SharePoint stores your new page. Click Create to display a new blank Web Part page, as shown in the following illustration.

Use Excel Services in the Dashboard To make the dashboard more interesting, you can use the next exercise to get some data from an Excel workbook and show it on the page by using the Excel Web Access Web Part.

Before doing that though, you need an Excel workbook. You can use almost any workbook to do this. The following example walks you through the steps to create a simple workbook that works with some of the filters you can add to the page in later sections of this chapter. Create the Excel Workbook The workbook creation process has two parts. First you need to add a pivot table connected to OLAP data in Analysis Services, and then you can generate a chart from that data.

To add a pivot table to a workbook 1. Start the data connection wizard in Excel, click the Data tab, click From Other Sources, and select From Analysis Services, as shown in the following illustration.

In the Import Data dialog box, choose PivotTable Report to create a new pivot table report in your sheet. In the PivotTable Field List dialog box, choose Sales from the topmost filter to see only those fields relevant for the Sales data. This adds the primary data to the spreadsheet that we are working with.

To add a simple chart to the workbook 1. Continuing with the same file you created in the preceding procedure, make sure your cell selection is located in the pivot table, and on the Insert tab, click Pie to choose a Pie chart. To format the chart so that it looks a little better in the report, move the chart and then grab its corner to resize it so that it fits next to your pivot table.

Optionally, choose a chart style that you like from the chart ribbon. You should now have a finished report that resembles the following illustration.

Inside Microsoft SharePoint 2010

Save the workbook to SharePoint, and view it in a browser by using Excel Services. When you view the workbook on the server, make sure the pivot table refreshes and that all your data connectivity is working. Prepare the Workbook for the Dashboard: Add Parameters Because the ultimate goal is to end up with multiple Web Parts on a dashboard page, you need a way to filter the data on the page at the same time.

You can use a SharePoint filter to do this. A SharePoint filter is yet another Web Part on the page that takes a given value and sends it to other Web Parts on the page. Then, based on the value provided by the SharePoint filter Web Part, the other Web Parts can change or filter the data they display. This simple mechanism enables users to choose a given value and then see all the different Web Parts on the page get filtered by their choice.

Before configuring the Excel Services Web Parts so that they can be filtered, you need to make some simple modifications to the workbook file so that it can be filtered in the dashboard. There may be some additional processes that you will want to incorporate into your solution as you build it. I am not sure I could count the number of times I have heard from users about the difficulty they have learning and using new systems.

I am sure that as you read this, you can relate to these statements as well as add others you have heard from your users. While these complaints are not specific to project management, they should definitely be taken into consideration while you develop your solution. The following list summarizes some of the common pain points that you will address in the solution. Summarizing the Business Problem In this section, three different areas of common business problems surrounding projects have been discussed.

So far, only a very high-level description of common issues and pain points has been identified. The next step in the process is to look deeper into each of the issues and clearly determine specific requirements.

Sure, you could take what you have learned so far and build a solution that satisfied the requirements at hand, but how effective would that solution be?

Do you even fully understand the requirements at this point? Now is the time to drill down to that next level and really start to gather those requirements.

This is where you spend time talking with different users to learn about what they are currently doing and develop an understanding of their pain points. The high-level issues identified earlier will serve as our starting point for the requirements gathering phase.

Gathering Information During this step of building the project management solution, you are going to look in more detail at the specific requirements of the system.

You will start by evaluating each group of users who will use the system to get a good understanding of what they will use the system for. As you meet with users and look at their needs, you will be able to identify the specific requirements that need to be included in the solution. System Users Our solution is going to be built based on the requirements of three types of users. Each group will interact with the solution differently, and to ensure that the solution is as effective and usable as possible, it is important to understand the specific needs of each user group.

Keep in Mind! Remember as you read through this section that your organization might operate differently and might use different terms to describe its users. If that is the case, then once you review this section, spend some time evaluating the differences within your organization. Once you understand the differences, you should be able to adapt the proposed solution to meet your specific requirements.

You should be using this book as a template to get you started, so expect to learn from this book and then adapt what you learn to your specific needs. Project Committee The project committee, in our example, is a group of users who are directly responsible for the strategic direction of projects within the organization.

They provide oversight, direction, and approval for projects and are responsible for understanding how projects relate to the direction of the organization. They approve the start of all new projects and provide strategic direction for the completion of projects.

When it comes to project management, several common complaints exist within different organizations.

In the next section you are going to look at several of the common issues that organizations try to address when they build a solution for project management. You will use these common complaints as the requirements for the solution you will build in the remainder of this chapter.

Important As you read about the issues that are identified, take some time to think about how they apply to your organization. Do you see the same issues?

Can you identify additional issues that your organization faces that might not be discussed here? Many of us struggle with information overload.

Microsoft SharePoint 2010

We have access to so much content that it is often hard to determine what is most important and relevant. Content comes in many shapes and formats and can be defined as the information and data that is accessed while we perform our jobs.

We access content online, in documents, in the form of personal meetings, and even more in the form of email. We often work with content in various phases and often save copies of the content at each phase. Saving different versions is important because you need to understand how the content progressed from draft to final, but an issue comes up later in the same project when you have to go back and reference the data.

Which version is the latest version? Who last made updates? When users were working on the project, it was easy to keep up with the chain of control, but three months later it can be hard to remember. In addition, having many versions of the content, users have a lot of places to store them. They typically have access to several shared drives, a few personal drives, various SharePoint sites, a local hard drive, and, of course, email storage.

Storing content in so many different locations can easily create a large web of disorganized content. While one user or one group might have a very detailed, structured way to store content, what happens when the organization realigns and users move to different groups or departments?

What happens to the content then?

Table of Contents

The following list identifies specific content management issues you will address in the SharePoint solution that you build in this chapter. For each additional topic discussed in this section, a new list of issues will be presented. These will then be used in the design section of the chapter as checkpoints to ensure that the solution proposed addresses the issues discussed. The next issue to explore involves the amount of process information that is contained within our resources.

Spend a few minutes thinking about the people who work at your organization. Think about the people who have been there the longest. Now think about what would be lost if they left the organization?

How much data would they take with them when they walked out the door? The data I am referring to is not physical documentation or files but an understanding of how the organization does business.

Longtime employees understand the ins and the outs, and they understand how to get things done, and without them your organization will likely suffer a loss of productivity and efficiency.

This way you are relying on a defined process and not the resources themselves. Having a structure like this in place will provide an easier way to switch out employees and to mentor new employees when they are brought onboard.

New book: Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Creating and Implementing Real-World Projects

But here is where it gets tricky. While there are many standard processes, there are just as many unique processes for each organization. The following list describes some of the general processes that can be put in place, but to really make the most out of this solution, you will want to spend some time thinking about various processes that are unique to your organization and how your organization manages projects.

There may be some additional processes that you will want to incorporate into your solution as you build it. The final area to discuss is usability. I am not sure I could count the number of times I have heard from users about the difficulty they have learning and using new systems.

I am sure that as you read this, you can relate to these statements as well as add others you have heard from your users. While these complaints are not specific to project management, they should definitely be taken into consideration while you develop your solution.

The following list summarizes some of the common pain points that you will address in the solution.Using the combined collaboration features of SharePoint —which includes Microsoft SharePoint Foundation and Microsoft SharePoint Server —plus the design and customization capabilities of Microsoft SharePoint Designer , organizations can enable their users to create, manage, and easily build SharePoint sites that are discoverable throughout the organization.

Notice that the Web Part no longer displays this page as a spreadsheet. The disadvantage is that it can be all too easy to cause havoc in your installation.

You learned about the basic administration a developer needs to know, how SharePoint organizes its data, and how you would go about using a standard SharePoint site and a standar This was a short and sweet chapter that served as a basic introduction to SharePoint and its usage. To format the chart so that it looks a little better in the report, move the chart and then grab its corner to resize it so that it fits next to your pivot table.

For now, turn the toolbar off. Getting Started Learn about the new features in SharePoint Once you understand the differences, you should be able to adapt the proposed solution to meet your specific requirements.

ANDREAS from Houma
Browse my other posts. I am highly influenced by wingsuit flying. I do enjoy partially .
>